Category Archives: Snowboard Gear Reviews

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Snowboard Boot Systems

Learn how to snowboard with a comfortable boot. Soft boots are what most snowboarders use. There are hard boots that alpine snowboarders wear. They’re very similar to ski boots. The 3 Snowboard Types lets you know what type of rider you are. Depending on what type of rider you are will help you select your boot. I recommend a medium to stiff on your flex of your boot. Think of new tennis/basketball shoes, the newer shoes are stiff and need to be broken in a little for better movement. I ride a lot and know I’ll break in my boots and wear them out so I get stiff boots plus I like that support for my aggressive style of riding. If I were to get soft flex boots I’d wear them out and not have the support I like. When I ride a lot of park and like softer boots. I ride a lot, wear out my boots and have to buy another pair. Most snowboard boot companies give you a 1 year warranty, so if you ride tons you’ll wear your boots out and can get a new pair. That’s nice since most boots run between $100-$500 so ask about the warranty of the boot. This online snowboard lesson will go over Soft Boot Systems.

You’ll have access to all our snowboard tutorials when you signup that cover every step and feedback from your coach. We also have some free snowboard videos to prepare for equipment on our YouTube Page. I recommend watching these snowboard videos; Snowboard Freestyle Boards, What To Wear Snowboarding, Demo Boards, Snowboard Camber, and Freeride Boards. Learn to snowboard online with flowingfreeride.com, Take Placement Quiz, take a look at Our Blog for more free content, and learn to snowboard right!

You’ll have options on how soft or stiff your boot is but also the lace system. You can go the ol’ skool way traditional laces just like on your shoes or a laceless system. I’ve used all the systems and like the laceless system where I pull lace and click to teeth on boot. There is the metal wire rachet system as well. The regular lace system takes a lot of time and strength to tie and can come undone if they’re not tied right. If you have younger kids you’ll be doing this so get something easier. A big pro to laces is you can crank them as tight as you want and if they break you can easily go buy shoelaces almost anywhere. The laceless systems will have to be sent to company to repair. With the metal lace rachet system I’ve had problems with it not locking and then the boot is loose all the time. The thin thread material is quick and secures very well. I’ve found them to be more reliable but if the thread breaks it’s hard to replace.

I have a large foot and like to keep my footprint as small as possible on the snowboard. I get a boot that curves up a little at my toe and heel to give me a few more centimeters or a smaller foot so I can get higher edge angles when I carve. I don’t like to ‘boot out’ or my foot goes into the snow and lifts my board off the snow resulting in a crash. If you’re moving from a L1 RAW beginner to L2 RIDER intermediate you’ll want to have your own boots. Your boots are the first piece of snowboard equipment you’ll want to buy. They’re custom and provide such comfort. I’ve had students say they’ve tried to snowboard but felt awkward. I’ve recommended getting their own boots and that has made all the difference. You’re boots need to fit and be secure. If you heels come out while doing a toeside your boots are too loose or too big.
Go try on some boots and the different lace systems to see what you like. You can signup to get access to all of our snowboard lessons, study guides, text books, glossary, tests and direct feedback from your coach. Learn to snowboard online with flowingfreeride.com and take a look at our YouTube Page for more free content and learn to snowboard right.

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Intermediate Snowboarder Equipment – The Snowboard

By the time you have got off the bunny hill and are able to keep some rhythm you’ll want to get a snowboard that is specific to you and your riding style. I recommend a snowboard with some shape or camber. You may want a board with a deep side cut. Possibly you might want beveled edges or a hard stiff snowboard or soft flexible snowboard. You may not know what you want. You can go into a shop and tell them your style. They can size the board to your body while you are there. Usually the more you weigh/taller the bigger the snowboard. The snowboard plays such a big part of how you ride especially as an intermediate snowboarder.

This is where you get to experiment and explore. Spend more time out on the mountain riding. I usually will buy a set up after researching what technology is offered by the boots, snowboard, bindings and price. Demo shops are convenient if you don’t know what you want to ride for sure. By the time you spend as much time riding as me you know exactly how to set up everything. Your stance, angles, beveled edges, forward lean will change from the type of riding you’re doing or conditions on the mountain. There are reference alignments or standards that can be used to refer to for the most efficient movements and performances. You are unique so log some more days in the mountains riding different conditions and terrain.

Most mountains/resorts will have a snowboard demo day where several companies come out and let you ride the snowboards for free. This saves money no matter what level you are; Beginner Snowboarder, Intermediate Snowboarder or Advanced Snowboarder. Demo snowboards, ride your friends snowboard or borrow one. My mates and I will sometimes switch our snowboard setups for a run if our boots fit the bindings. This is great if you’re a new rider getting into snowboarding because you get to test the different snowboard technologies out there.

You can signup to get access to all of our snowboard lessons, study guides, text books, glossary, tests and direct feedback from your coach. Learn to snowboard online with flowingfreeride.com and take a look at our YouTube Page for more free content and learn to snowboard right.

 

 

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Park/Freestyle Rider

A park is an area step-up on the mountain that has features used to practice tricks and freestyle snowboarding. Most parks will have some of the following: boxes, rails, jumps, handrails, vehicles, stairs, bumps, rollers, half-pipes, berms, and/or other features. Some parks will be set up for the Boarder X, which is a race course with features, or more freestyle like pipe, jumps and rails. Most mountains that have good parks have a lot of mild slopes with no double fall lines. Parks are set up on terrain similar to beginner slopes like green or mild blue trails. Of course, more extreme parks use very steep slopes. Park riders may not care about the rest of the mountain trails and many areas specialize just in parks and pipe. They ride freestyle snowboards which are designed for freestyle riding (soft flex, twin tip, detuned edges). You want to be an intermediate snowboarder before going into the park.

Where To Find Parks?

If you’re a park snowboarder, do your research, since a lot of resort areas either specialize in great parks or great trails and steep slopes. When you can find a resort that has both you’re in a prime spot. But, in general, it is unusual for a mountain to have great parks and pipe along with great free ride trails. If they have a great park, they may not have as many black trails or steeps. For instance, Copper Mountain Resort in Colorado has great parks/pipe along with steep terrain and lots of off piste, trees, steeps, and black diamond trails. The parks are setup so you can hit the small park at top, the medium park midway, the big park near the bottom and the pipe at the bottom. It’s where I got my freestyle certification. However, Park City Resort base in Utah has great park/pipe but not many long steep off piste trails, it is still a nice beautiful mountain great for families, but if you’re looking to go off piste or in the backcountry there isn’t as many options. Park City merged with Canyons to become a super resort. If you’re looking for parks/pipe ride the Park City base side and hit Canyons base side for the off piste freeriding. Since they’re one now it’s a great resort for freeriding and freestyle riding.

Case in point: if you’re vacationing or new to an area and looking for a great freestyle park, don’t randomly pick a resort, ask around or you may be disappointed. Take a look at the resort map and you’ll see the areas that are parks. This will help you to Ride Right.

You can signup to get access to all of our snowboard lessons, study guides, text books, glossary, tests and direct feedback from your coach. Learn to snowboard online with flowingfreeride.com and take a look at our YouTube Page for more free content and learn to snowboard right.